Compra de entradas

La función por hacer

La función por hacer

9 Sep - 23 Nov 2016

Discover more Buy Tickets

INTRODUCTION

Following its runaway success for over more than six seasons, the Kamikaze Theatre’s Ambigú recovers this September La función por hacer, Kamikaze Producciones’ first acclaimed work, winner of seven Max Awards. A play which, from the austere stage design and the work on the script, has emerged as one of the most attractive proposals of contemporary Spanish theatre of the last decade. “Theatre, ours is pure theatre,” states Miguel del Arco.

Read more

DATE

9 Sep – 23 Nov 2016

TIME

September
Friday 9 Sep, 10pm
Saturday 10 Sep, 11pm
Sunday 11 Sep, 8pm
Monday 19 and Tuesday 20 Sep, 8pm
Wednesday 21 and Thursday 22 Sep, 10pm
Monday 26 and Tuesday 27 Sep, 8pm
Wednesday 28 Sep, 10pm

October
Monday 31 Oct, 8pm

November
Monday 1 and 8 Nov, 10pm
Thursday 10 Nov, 10pm
Monday 14 and Tuesday 15 Nov, 8pm
Monday 21 Nov, 10pm
Tuesday 22 Nov, 8pm

AREA

The Ambigú

SHOW TIME

1 hour and 30 minutes

ABOUT THE PLAY

Following its runaway success for over more than six seasons, the Kamikaze Theatre’s Ambigú recovers this September La función por hacer, Kamikaze Producciones’ first acclaimed work, winner of seven Max Awards. A play which, from the austere stage design and the work on the script, has emerged as one of the most attractive proposals of contemporary Spanish theatre of the last decade. “Theatre, ours is pure theatre,” states Miguel del Arco.
This play saw the rise of Miguel del Arco as director and “re-creator” of great repertory texts. The “Six Characters in Search of an Author”, who, in the work of Pirandello, burst in on a rehearsal in the early twentieth century, are transferred to the performance of a modern production, turning them into “cultural terrorists”. They vehemently demand their right to tell their real story, which they say is more interesting than the stage fiction.
Theatre with no set, only a few inches away from the public, merging the truth of the characters with the actors’ performance. One more show begins in any old theatre. Two actors work hard on stage to tell the story they have been entrusted with. The play in question adds nothing new, but it is agile, even funny at times. A show you can see and enjoy and then leave the theatre and have a snack in the bar on the corner without upsetting your nervous system.
But something strange happens during the performance. Four people appear among the audience and they stand motionless, watching the actors. This makes things very uncomfortable, not only for the actors, who lose the concentration they need to continue performing, but also for the audience who are not used to, nor able to put up with the fractures of the comfortable fourth wall. The theatre shouldn’t be an uncomfortable place, should it? People go to the theatre to escape, don’t they? Unless it is “necessary to free the artist and the audience of the influence of the opinion of the educated. We must learn to do without the disapproval of those who are constrained by their emotional capacity to consider art as an elegant pastime.”
Contradicting the wishes of the author who dreamed of them but did not want, or could not steer them to the world of art, these four characters who have appeared and remain motionless among the spectators, who have religiously paid their entrance fee, speak directly to the actors and the audience. They try to get their attention in order to tell them, and even revive before their eyes, they say, the drama that has driven them to break into the room.
The actors look surprisingly at one another and make the audience share their surprise: is this part of the show, is it an invention or is it a conspiracy to disrupt the show? Are these four characters in on the game with the actors or are they just troublemakers? Is this part of the show? Since when is the audience required to express themselves during a theatre performance? Is this an act of cultural terrorism?
The characters take advantage of these moments of confusion to vehemently expose the reasons behind their existence. They have, they say, a right to exist and, therefore, they are determined to tell their story. They should be quiet so the two actors may continue with the performance and everything may carry on “as it should”, but their story is so “real” that it is not easy to break away from it. So real and so intimately recognisable that it seems obscene. What would the audience do if they were given the opportunity to choose between watching the entertaining and inoffensive performance they were watching protected by the darkness, or listen to what these “characters” have to say even though they may feel concerned?.

ARTISTIC FACT SHEET

DirectorMiguel del Arco
AdaptationMiguel del Arco and Aitor Tejada
PerformersIsrael Elejalde, Teresa Hurtado de Ory, Nuria García, Miriam Montilla, Manuela Paso, Daniel Pérez Prada, Raúl Prieto and Cristóbal Suárez
Sound designSandra Vicente (Studio 340)
Lighting designJuanjo Llorens
Graphic DesignAscensión Biosca
Executive producerAitor Tejada
A production by Kamikaze Producciones